Thursday, December 9, 2010

Vic Toews in the Thick of the Brutality at the G-20 in Toronto

It was Stephen Harper's decision to hold the G-20 in Toronto. It was his decision to spend an enormous sum of money on security and it was he who bragged about this decision on the videotron at the G-20.

To suggest that the feds can now just wash their hands of the whole ordeal is ludicrous.

We need to be damn mad at anyone and everyone involved in what has been called the "most massive compromise of civil liberties in Canadian history."

If Toews is crying ignorance, he's only confirming something we already knew. But unfortunately for the Harper government, stupidity is not a legal defense.

Look at this guy. His actions are indefensible.

15 comments:

  1. Consider the possibility that Blair may just be the fall guy in all this. He has insisted he was in charge of policing decisions outside the red zone where G20 leaders were meeting.

    But was he really?

    http://www.nowtoronto.com/news/story.cfm?content=175852

    The Integrated Safety Unit (ISU) charged with summit security, created by the RCMP, was composed of forces – including the OPP and the Canadian military – with greater jurisdictional authority than Toronto police in matters of international security.

    The summit was a federal undertaking, but under treaty rules that govern the protection of international dignitaries, it’s the province that was called upon to fulfill security obligations.

    That means all roads lead back to one Julian Fantino, the OPP commish and former Toronto chief who, it is well known, has no love for his successor. (Fantino’s contract expired this month. Word came down Wednesday, July 7, that he will be replaced by Chris Lewis effective August 1.)

    No one but those inside the G20 command centre in Barrie can know what went on in the crucial moments during the protests Saturday and how plans evolved in response to changing conditions. But it’s clear there was some pushing and shoving between Blair and Fantino.

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  2. Harper protects his man Elliott through thick and thin:

    A senior Mountie commander told the federal government that RCMP Commissioner William Elliott “disrupted” the federal government’s billion-dollar security operation for the G8 and G20 summits – simply by showing up for the events.

    “Despite being advised not to attend the summit command centres on June 25, 2010, the commissioner chose to attend, and in doing so, completely disrupted operations,” Mike McDonell, then an RCMP assistant commissioner, wrote in a letter to Public Safety Minister Vic Toews.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/rcmp-boss-hurt-g20-security-efforts-letter-from-senior-mountie/article1762946/
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  3. WHAT WAS OPP GENERALISSIMO JULIAN FANTINO'S ROLE IN ALL OF THIS?

    http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=135629036463012&topic=426

    toronto police have alienated a great many people on their conduct during the G-20 and the conflict in your management may be related to the boss learning that RCMP Chief Superintendent MacNiel took de facto control of policing in the City of Toronto outside of the IPP fenced and secured areas ... I hope not.

    Chief Bill Blair of the TPS made a public statement that he was always in charge of TO but he also said that he could not get control of his cops for more then 2 hours on Sunday night when the cops were holding several hundred people in the rain (while Blair said he was arguing with someone he did not identify to let the people go) ... if his argument was with MacNiel and not the OPP and Peel Regional Police management, (although most shoulder flashes showed TPS) it would be another serious blow to RCMP reputation the rank and file members do not need.


    Lot's of speculation on who took control and ordered what on Saturday and Sunday and the OPP has very quietly pointed fingers at the RCMP's MacNiel but it may yet develop that OPP Chief Julian Fantino was calling the shots and interfering with Bill Blair (Fantino's contract was extended by the Ontario cabinet in 2009 until July 2010 after the G-20 so that he could exercise control of Ontario's policing interests at the G-8 and G-20 on the behalf of the Ontario Security Minister/Solicitor General).
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  4. Marin calls TPS ground zero for mis use of the fence rule.

    But Bill Blair says the legal team associated with ISU asked for it.

    The RCMP sent a statement during Blair’s P&P interview saying they knew nothing basically humilitating him on live t.v. Hmmm, that sounds like something HarperCon would order.


    ISU lawyers incorrectly briefed Blair’s legal team on the legislation. Blair was told anyone within five metres of the fence would be subject to the act. So when news of the so-called “secret law” broke the Friday of the G20 weekend and Blair was summoned to explain, he was left
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  5. Chief Bill Blair on P&P said that it was the ISU's legal team who requested he request the law from McGuinty.

    ISU was a FEDERAL creation and under FEDERAL control...

    Blair wasn't even part of the ISU.

    This doesn't look good for Toews and the RCMP.

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  6. I'm just throwing this one as it's strange:

    http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:rW2FDvnXZDIJ:www2.macleans.ca/2010/11/04/mitchel-raphael-star-candidate/+fantino+barrie+g20&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca

    Robert Viera · 4 weeks ago
    Perhaps Julian Fantino could have tipped off the RCMP that the building in Barrie the federal government rented for their G8/G20 command centre was owned by the same company that has a property just around the corner that the OPP recently had 'restrained' under proceeds of crime legislation in connection with the OPP's arrest of the alleged masterminds of a large indoor marijuana grow-op busted by police in 2004 at a former brewery in Barrie.

    I looked at some of the documents that the government released about G8/G20 summit spending on Friday, but the entries about the rental of the Barrie building were partially greyed-out and did not include the cost of renting the building.

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  7. Should I believe this:

    Q: Why did TPS need the PWP Act when the RCMP decided not to use it?

    A: Each partner in the ISU [Integrated Security Unit, headed by the RCMP] was responsible for preparing their personnel and operations to meet their obligations during the Summits. Please contact TPS for their decision on using the PWP Act. The RCMP was confident that our planning, resources and available lawful authorities in place to protect the visiting International Protected Persons and the public during the Summits were sufficient.


    OR THIS


    Mr. Blair says that city lawyers acting in concert with the integrated security unit

    – the multi-level command structure for the G20 – decided to ask the provincial government to use an old wartime ordinance for protecting public property, the Public Works Protection Act.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/toronto/marcus-gee/take-a-deep-breath-over-calls-for-blairs-head/article1830819/

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  8. This is why we need a full inquiry. Who am I supposed to believe when everybody is pointing fingers?

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    the Public Works Protection Act became a source of friction within the Integrated Security Unit for which it was ostensibly created:

    e-mails from ISU members distance OPP and RCMP forces from the regulation, with one July 1 e-mail noting the regulation was “clearly a [Toronto Police Service] request.”

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ontario-never-should-have-enacted-g20-summit-security-law-ombudsmans-report-says/article1828414/
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    And Blair says the idea came from ISU lawyers. Who are the ISU laywers?
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  9. Canadian Law Professors Call for Public Inquiry

    40 law professors from across Canada have published an open letter to federal public safety minister Vic Toews.


    http://g20bulletin.org/2010/07/19/canadian-law-professors-call-for-public-inquiry/

    As you know, Toronto police chief Bill Blair later admitted that ISU members were mistaken as to the powers conferred to them under that regulation.

    Minister Toews, we cannot reconcile the numerous eyewitness and media accounts of the G20 protests with your statement on June 28, 2010, that the ISU acted with “professionalism” and thanking ISU members for their “exceptional work”. We therefore call upon you to initiate a full and independent inquiry into the actions of the ISU during the G20.

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  10. It may have been Toronto police on the streets, but the Feds ran the show. It had been that way from the start. It was the Prime Minister that insisted, over Toronto's objections, on holding the G20 at the Convention Centre. It was the ISU that wanted the Public Works Protection Act. [Toronto Police chief Bill] Blair is wearing it, but operational command was MacNeil's.

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=20074
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  11. Who are we to believe. Bill Blair or the ISU? All I know is that Harper controls the ISU via his RCMP puppet guy:

    http://www.ombudsman.on.ca/media/157555/g20final1-en.pdf

    An internal Ministry business case notes that the “local police forces”
    had requested that the province seek an agreement under the Act. The Toronto
    Police Service and the provincial Ministry appear to have believed that if an
    agreement could be reached, this would enhance security for the summits and
    further legitimate the erection of the perimeter security fence. Federal lawyers
    apparently disagreed with the suggestion that the Act could be applied in this
    manner, and expressed concern about the precedent that this would set

    It appears that the federal government’s reluctance to enter into an agreement under
    the Foreign Missions and International Organizations Act provided increased
    incentive for officials to look to the Public Works Protection Act. Under the
    federal Act, the RCMP appeared to have clear authority to construct and control the
    interior security barrier for the “red zone,” but the Toronto Police Service believed
    that unless it was somehow delegated power under that legislation, it would have to
    look elsewhere for incontrovertible legal support to construct and control the
    exterior security fence.

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  12. Sorry for spamming Emily, but I am ENRAGED over this while Harper his hiding from everything.

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  13. Spam away Nadine. You always provide such useful information and your outrage is inspiring.

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  14. sign the petition:
    https://www.change.org/en-CA/petitions/call-for-a-public-inquiry-into-charter-rights-violations-during-the-toronto-g20

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